Author: Amyris

  • Water Walk with Vivian Recollet

    Join us and Turtle Protectors to celebrate World Water Day with a Water walk led by Vivian Recollet,

  • 2024 Wetland Walks

    Join us for our monthly walks Starting Sunday Jan 20 10:00 am. Build community and get to know Turtle’s home (High Park) over the whole year. Supported by TD Friends of the Environment Fund.

  • What is a Turtle nest protector

    A nest protector is a square or octagon wood frame with a wire mesh on top and small notches on each side. Their purpose is to protect turtle nests. Before you decide to use a nest protector, read completely this post.

  • Forest Therapy Experience (Fundraiser)

    Join us May 10th 7 pm at this fundraising event to be able to host an important cultural ceremonial gathering to kick off our season. Funds raised will help pay for Elders, Drummers, Singers, and Fire Keeper to conduct the ceremony.

  • What is Wetland Biodiversity?

    The Wetlands in High Park are unique environments knows as the Grenadier wetland complex. This means that they are aquatic environments located within land boundaries. Wetlands include lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, groundwater, springs, cave waters, floodplains, as well as bogs, marshes and swamps.

  • Water Walk with Vivian Recollet

    Celebrate World Water Day with us and the High Park Nature Centre by joining our Water Walk Mar 22nd 6pm. Led by Vivian Recollet.

  • Why Snow is Essential

    Water is life. Snow is one of many forms of water. Snow is life. Seasonal snow is an essential part of Mother Earth’s climate system. Snow cover helps to regulate the temperature of Mother Earth’s surface, and once that snow melts, the water helps fill rivers and reservoirs in many regions of the world.

  • Wetland Walks

    Join us for our monthly walks Starting Sunday Jan 22 10:30 am. Build community and get to know Turtle’s home (High Park) over the whole year. 

  • Road Salt is a danger to Wildlife!

    In winter and spring, Road salt dissolves easily in water and flows from roads and parking lots into the sewers, and then into our creeks, wetlands, rivers and lakes. The salt levels in groundwater and surface water regularly reach levels that are dangerous for wildlife and waterways!

  • Indigenous Views

    By Carolynne Crawley Indigenous peoples have been and continue to be in a deep and reciprocal relationship with these lands, waters, and beings since time immemorial.