What is Wetland Biodiversity?

The Wetlands in High Park are unique environments knows as the Grenadier wetland complex. This means that they are aquatic environments located within land boundaries. Wetlands include lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, groundwater, springs, cave waters, floodplains, as well as bogs, marshes and swamps.

“Indigenous people identify wetlands as gardens, which are very important land and water spaces to gather and harvest various plants and plant parts for medicines, foods, and materials. It is interesting to note that although Indigenous people used wetlands extensively, colonial settlers saw no value in them.” (Definition by Paul W. Pouliot, Sag8mo, Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook-Abenaki People)

It is essential to acknowledge the importance of wetlands and learn that they are integral to the Indigenous way of life as a food, material and medicine resource, as well as a place to retreat and be safe.

While much research exists on ocean and marine environments, wetlands have considerably less attention within the topic of biodiversity.

Wetlands biodiversity consist of the biodiversity of the water as well as the land around it. Because all terrestrial animals and plants depend on fresh water the boundaries between aquatic and terrestrial biodiversity are blurred. At the species level, wetland biodiversity includes all beings that depend upon inland water habitat for more than just drinking or transpiration. These include beings that live in water or use the water for other important purposes such as to reproduce.

Wetlands biodiversity consist of the biodiversity of the water as well as the land around it. Because all terrestrial animals and plants depend on fresh water the boundaries between aquatic and terrestrial biodiversity are blurred. At the species level, wetland biodiversity includes all beings that depend upon inland water habitat for more than just drinking or transpiration. These include beings that live in water or use the water for other important purposes such as to reproduce.

Unfortunately, there are many threats to wetland biodiversity which is declining faster than any other biome, meaning that it requires our immediate attention. Threats to this biodiversity include the growth of human populations, infrastructure development such as dams, nutrient overloading, unsustainable use of water and non-native species.

So, what can we do to stop this harmful pattern? Those causing habitat loss in wetlands need to understand their harmful impact and take responsibility. Awareness, improved relationship with water and support from governments are all necessary to support biodiversity. 


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  • What is Wetland Biodiversity?

    The Wetlands in High Park are unique environments knows as the Grenadier wetland complex. This means that they are aquatic environments located within land boundaries. Wetlands include lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, groundwater, springs, cave waters, floodplains, as well as bogs, marshes and swamps. “Indigenous people identify wetlands as gardens, which are very important land and…